The delightful hummingbirds, the butterflies, the sea birds and the islands homemade rum

Nevis is an island of just 10,000 people and embraced by splendid Caribbean and Atlantic beaches, it stretches 8 miles long and 6 miles wide. A one hour drive around the coastal road will take you past colonial and West Indian style homes, historic plantations and, the remains of sugar mills with views up to the unparalleled natural beauty of Nevis Peak and tropical rain forests.

Green velvet monkeys, brought over by the French in the 17th century, and mongoose are among many wildlife who call Nevis home. Then there are the local donkeys, chickens, sheep (tails down), goats (tails up) along with the delightful hummingbirds, the butterflies and sea birds.

Life has a relaxed pace on Nevis, just go with the flow

Life has a relaxed pace on Nevis, just go with the flow

Rich island wildlife are just as friendly as the locals

Rich island wildlife are just as friendly as the locals

Visitors are warmly embraced by the gentle islanders

Nevis proclaimed independence from the British in 1983, and is part of the Federation of St. Christophers (St. Kitts) & Nevis. St. Kitts is just a few miles away.

The Sibonay people were Nevis’ first occupants. It was later settled by the Arawak and Carib Indians from South America.

The Spanish, Dutch, French and British all have battled over what became known as Queen of the Caribees to lord over an island whose sugar production out delivered many colonies combined, including New York.

When tourists from those very same countries now visit Nevis, they are warmly embraced by the gentle islanders who genuinely welcome them.

People of Nevis love to cook, to share their abundant natural store cupboard and add a touch of spice to everyones life

People of Nevis love to cook, to share their abundant natural store cupboard and add a touch of spice to everyones life